In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]

Yes, you can. Just like the answer about peanut butter above, some dogs can be allergic to things like gluten found in regular flour. Whole wheat flour can have some more nutrients which is always great, or you can use an alternative flour like coconut flour. I always recommend letting your dog sample a small amount before giving them lots of treats, because dogs can be allergic to anything, just like people!


The pumpkin variant smells of cinnamon and ginger, and is helpful for easily-agitated stomachs. It contains no eggs or dairy that commonly trigger allergies and gastrointestinal problems in dogs. Dog owners who have spent fortunes on their dogs’ allergies are understandably wary over pet food. Thus, it’s a great relief for them to find a treat that’s both well-liked by their dog and works well with their dog’s systems.

Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.


Studies show that treat time is much more exciting for a dog when he has to do something to earn it.5 For example, you can use healthy dog treats as an incentive to exercise more, solve a puzzle (such as figuring out how to get a treat that’s inside a toy), or simply behave better. Most experts recommend that you give your dog a treat for actually accomplishing something, rather than just hand it out randomly.
These best healthy dog treats are made in the USA and do not include artificial preservatives or common fillers, such as soy, wheat, corn, and gluten, that are found in many regular dog treats. Each bag of these gourmet dog treats contains approximately 25 sticks that are 7” to 8” long, which may be given whole or broken into pieces for smaller breeds.
Pumpkin is known as a remedy for a dog’s upset stomach, but it’s also great for healthy dog treats. Put a tablespoon of canned pumpkin in your dog’s bowl and you’ll be amazed at how fast it disappears. Pumpkin — since it contains A LOT of fiber — is a great way to fight both diarrhea and constipation. So if your pup is having bathroom troubles, try a little pumpkin. Plus, it has other healthy ingredients like vitamin A (great for eyesight), potassium (which promotes healthy nerves and muscles), and many other important ingredients. But remember: Since too much vitamin A can be toxic to dogs, don’t make pumpkin a regular part of your pup’s diet.
×