The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.

As you can see from the reviews above, customers agree that even the pickiest of dogs love any type of organic dog treats, but are even more eager to please when offered Rocco & Roxie Supply Co treats over others. Although the price tag is a deterrent for some, others insist that these best healthy dog treats are worth the cost on account of the value of the product and these being USDA organic certified treats. Customers appreciate the fact that these natural dog treats do not leave the typical smell and grease on their hands, and, unlike other treats, the jerky sticks actually smell very pleasant according to most.


Dried apricots are other healthy dog treats, as long as your dog eats them in moderation. They’re filled with fiber as well as many other nutrients that help your dog’s immune system. These nutrients include beta-carotene, which is good for vision, and potassium, which helps improve muscle and bone health. Never give the pit of an apricot (or any food) to a dog, because it’s a choking hazard and could be poisonous.
Dogs of various breeds love this biscuit, so it is a handy one to bring during training. There have been no reports of allergies or adverse reactions. There were very few dogs, however, that didn’t like the treat and preferred other brands. Overall, this is one of the best healthy treats for dogs available in pet supply and online stores now that's also USDA certified.
The sweet potato is another human food that makes for healthy dog treats that your four-legged friend will love. It’s not only full of nutrients such as vitamins C and A that are great for skin and the immune system, it’s also a great source of fiber, which can make sure your dog’s digestive tract works properly. You can find sweet potato treats for dogs at your local pet store or make them at home. For a homemade touch, simply boil and puree some potatoes and put a spoonful or two in your dog’s bowl.

Spratt dominated the American market until 1907, when F. H. Bennett, whose own dog biscuits were faring poorly against those of the larger company, had the idea of making them in the shape of a bone. "His 'Maltoid Milk-Bones' were such a success that for the next fifteen years Bennett's Milk-Bone dominated the commercial dog food market in America."[18] In 1931, the National Biscuit Company, now known as Nabisco, bought the company.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!

I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.

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