Yes, you can. Just like the answer about peanut butter above, some dogs can be allergic to things like gluten found in regular flour. Whole wheat flour can have some more nutrients which is always great, or you can use an alternative flour like coconut flour. I always recommend letting your dog sample a small amount before giving them lots of treats, because dogs can be allergic to anything, just like people!
These best healthy treats for dogs are great for snacks, rewards and training bait. They are definitely one of the best organic dog treats out there, too. Most customers who bought this product had dogs that couldn’t take chicken or other meat products without itching and losing hair. This non-GMO, organic and duck-based treat is also cheaper than many of the best healthy treats for dogs.
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.
What can you replace wheat germ with? I made these and I used a cup of oats that I ground to a powder in the food processor since I forgot to buy it and I had to make these treats on my day off…I also added peanut butter! I figured i’d ask for the next batch 🙂 they came out great and they are so healthy you did great research! Roxy and Mojo thank you!
Facts are important, Debi, but this article on “naturalsociety.com” does not provide any. It cites minimal references, none of which actually describe a definitive link between peanut consumption and cancer. I would instead refer to peer-reviewed literature, like this article http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/9/1757S.full.pdf+html, which indicates that the relationship is unclear, but possibly beneficial.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
It’s best not to feed hard treats like this to dogs because they’re hard to digest and are not a natural food for them. They don’t digest grains and flour. It causes digestive problems and aggravates health conditions like allergies and seizures. Peanuts and peanut butter contain aflotoxins which cause cancer. People and animals are advised NOT to eat both items.
Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
Since I first made this quick and easy dog biscuit recipe, I’ve done a lot of experimenting. While this is a great starter recipe (since it’s made from only 3 ingredients that you probably have in your kitchen right now), don’t forget to scroll through my other recipes. I make everything from gluten-free snacks to frozen treats to help your pooch beat the heat! 
It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
I’m super late to the dog baking party, but reading through the comments, I see no one else offered a coconut flour tip… I made these last night, and the dough was way too crumby with the same amount of coconut flour as wheat flour. I read up on it, you should only use 20% of the amount of regular flour, and then add the same amount of liquid. When I made these cookies I ended up adding an extra egg and about 1/4 cup extra water. Mind you I actually halved the recipe. It was kind of dry and hard to work with, and my cookies were not hard or crunchy. 3 dogs in the house, and they all looked like Cookie Monster eating these, so they obviously didn’t care. I just wouldn’t give them away as gifts this batch, because the crumby dough baked into cookies with cracks that fall apart easily. :)

This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo


Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.

Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.
No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.

When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.
It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.

Pumpkin is known as a remedy for a dog’s upset stomach, but it’s also great for healthy dog treats. Put a tablespoon of canned pumpkin in your dog’s bowl and you’ll be amazed at how fast it disappears. Pumpkin — since it contains A LOT of fiber — is a great way to fight both diarrhea and constipation. So if your pup is having bathroom troubles, try a little pumpkin. Plus, it has other healthy ingredients like vitamin A (great for eyesight), potassium (which promotes healthy nerves and muscles), and many other important ingredients. But remember: Since too much vitamin A can be toxic to dogs, don’t make pumpkin a regular part of your pup’s diet.
Fruits and vegetables – Green beans not only provide the crunch that your dog loves, they’re also low in calories. Apples and raspberries are also low in calories and high in fiber. This will not only promote good digestion, but will also give him a feeling of fullness.2 As a result, your dog might not attack the dinner bowl quite as hard as usual.
A lot of pets simply can’t get enough of dog biscuits, because they love to chew and crunch – and they obviously love the taste, as well. There are a lot of different brands out there, but you need to look closely before choosing one, to make sure they’re healthy dog treats. Make sure they have all-natural ingredients, such as apples, sweet potatoes, chicken, and others. Try to stay away from products that contain preservatives, wheat, and artificial additives like coloring or flavors.
such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :)
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Prep for these chews is easy. Set your oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Slice your sweet potato length-wise, no thicker than ⅓ of an inch. Lay them on a baking sheet, lined with parchment paper if you have it, and bake for 1 ½ hours. Flip the chews over and bake for another 1 ½ hours. Let them cool before giving them to your dog, and store them in the fridge.
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.
Once you mix all of your ingredients together (oats, homemade chicken broth or water, and an egg), you will use your hands to form a dough ball. Note: Your dough ball will be sticky! If you’ve ever worked with a sticky dough before, you know it can get a bit messy at times. That’s why, to make the dough easier to work with, I let mine sit for 15 minutes. This allowed the dough to dry out a bit. If you use a rolling pin and cookie cutter to shape your treats, you might also want to sprinkle a little oat flour on your countertop (or whatever surface you’re spreading your dough onto), as well as on top of the dough ball before you begin rolling it flat. 
Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.

Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
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