Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.

Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.

Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.

Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.
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