No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) provides a list of dental chews that can go a long way toward knocking off the tartar and plaque that can build up in your dog’s mouth over time.1 This can lead to a wide range of problems, such as gum disease and oral infections. Unless you have a regimen of brushing your dog’s teeth every night, or go to your vet for regular cleanings, dental chews are healthy dog treats and are the best way to help ensure your canine’s oral health is as good as it can be.
Studies show that treat time is much more exciting for a dog when he has to do something to earn it.5 For example, you can use healthy dog treats as an incentive to exercise more, solve a puzzle (such as figuring out how to get a treat that’s inside a toy), or simply behave better. Most experts recommend that you give your dog a treat for actually accomplishing something, rather than just hand it out randomly.

Farcas says there’s another plus side to treating dogs with fruits and vegetables: fewer calories. “Often giving fresh fruits and vegetables is fewer calories than providing cookie-type, commercial treats,” she says. “Since there’s a tendency to over-provide treats to our pets and there’s a trend of obesity in our pets, I think that is an important concern.”
That being said, the ingredients below avoid any products that are well-known doggie no-nos (like, say, chocolate!) and focus on ingredients that are generally accepted as good for doggie-dom. Just like with human food, it depends on the individual. Your dog might be allergic to wheat or eggs or pumpkin or something else. So keep a close eye on your puppy any time you give them a new food or treat. Even though these dog treats are formulated to be as gentle on their systems and give them as many added nutritional benefits as possible, they still might not agree with some pooches.
Be aware that while most of the customers are very happy with these healthy dog treats by themselves, there's a lot of recorded proof of poor batches of these dog treats being sent out with white worms infesting the bag, with the last review coming from May, 2015. We suggest calling the manufacturer first, and always checking the FULL package before using these treats with your dog.

This means you'll need to do the math, but only once or twice, as you switch to new dog treats and new dog food. After that, always keep track of what type of best healthy dog treats you use, and how many calories each one of them contains, and how often you've spoiled your Fido. Choosing low calorie dog treats is key, and some – like Zuke's treats, mentioned below – may contain as little as 2-3 calories per their mini treat. For dogs, it's still a reward and a pleasurable experience, no matter how small the treat is.
My comment is based on facts, not that “giving treats is good for dogs.” No, only the correct food is good for dogs and the only correct diet for dogs is raw meat and bones. They don’t eat flour, make fire, bake anything…Poor and incorrect food along with vaccines is responsible for the poor health and shorter lives dogs have had for the last several decades. Before vaccines and “pet foods” dogs averageed life was 25 to 30 yrs without all these diseases they have now. Facts only are what’s important, not what people think or feel.
Cleaning the Cutters - You want to clean your dog cookie cutters as soon as your dog biscuits are in the oven. Using warm water and mild soap is usually all you'll need. Once they are washed, place them on a clean baking sheet and pop them into the oven for a couple minutes. This will help them to dry completely and avoid rust. Once they are cooled, they can be stored.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
The more treats you feed your dog, the fewer calories those treats should have! The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention suggests that a dog weighing around 50 pounds should get 700-900 calories a day. A few low-calorie treats here and there shouldn’t have much of an impact on your dog’s health or weight, but treats should not make up the bulk of your pet’s daily calories.4

Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!

Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:

The sweet potato is another human food that makes for healthy dog treats that your four-legged friend will love. It’s not only full of nutrients such as vitamins C and A that are great for skin and the immune system, it’s also a great source of fiber, which can make sure your dog’s digestive tract works properly. You can find sweet potato treats for dogs at your local pet store or make them at home. For a homemade touch, simply boil and puree some potatoes and put a spoonful or two in your dog’s bowl.
Greenies healthy treats for dogs relieve pet owners from having to search for homemade dog treats recipes due to their rigorous testing and quality control. These doggy chews serve as a way to promote healthier teeth and gums, fight tartar, plaque, bad breath, and add vitamins and minerals to a dog’s daily diet. These second best healthy dog treats are available in jumbo, large, regular, petite, and tiny “styles” and in five different size packages (6, 12, 18, 27, and 36 ounces).
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo

Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
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