And as far as taste goes, I didn’t try ’em out (although I could, because it’s all human food), but our puppers love them. Rory in particular will literally stand in front of the cabinet that holds these treats and whine at the door, hoping that it’ll magically open and the whole bag of treats will spill onto the floor. She’s a big fan. And I’m a big fan of knowing all the ingredients and of saving a pretty penny by making these over the high-quality, all-natural treats I have been buying her.

I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.

More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]


I’m super late to the dog baking party, but reading through the comments, I see no one else offered a coconut flour tip… I made these last night, and the dough was way too crumby with the same amount of coconut flour as wheat flour. I read up on it, you should only use 20% of the amount of regular flour, and then add the same amount of liquid. When I made these cookies I ended up adding an extra egg and about 1/4 cup extra water. Mind you I actually halved the recipe. It was kind of dry and hard to work with, and my cookies were not hard or crunchy. 3 dogs in the house, and they all looked like Cookie Monster eating these, so they obviously didn’t care. I just wouldn’t give them away as gifts this batch, because the crumby dough baked into cookies with cracks that fall apart easily. :)
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
Pumpkin is known as a remedy for a dog’s upset stomach, but it’s also great for healthy dog treats. Put a tablespoon of canned pumpkin in your dog’s bowl and you’ll be amazed at how fast it disappears. Pumpkin — since it contains A LOT of fiber — is a great way to fight both diarrhea and constipation. So if your pup is having bathroom troubles, try a little pumpkin. Plus, it has other healthy ingredients like vitamin A (great for eyesight), potassium (which promotes healthy nerves and muscles), and many other important ingredients. But remember: Since too much vitamin A can be toxic to dogs, don’t make pumpkin a regular part of your pup’s diet.
×