This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.
This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.
The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) provides a list of dental chews that can go a long way toward knocking off the tartar and plaque that can build up in your dog’s mouth over time.1 This can lead to a wide range of problems, such as gum disease and oral infections. Unless you have a regimen of brushing your dog’s teeth every night, or go to your vet for regular cleanings, dental chews are healthy dog treats and are the best way to help ensure your canine’s oral health is as good as it can be.
These treats are great! I think I foolishly measured wrong so I had to end up putting more whole wheat flour in. I did the first batch and tasted them, tasted yummy! I decided to add more of a zing and put a blob of creamy peanut butter into the second batch. These are for our puppy that is arriving this Saturday. Thank you for this recipe it rocks!
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
Last but not least, pay attention to the ingredient quality. The best healthy dog treats will usually have less ingredients than your average dog food brand, with the first being some type of animal meat source. For example, the first best healthy dog treats brand is Rocco & Roxie, and only contains beef as the main ingredient, with the rest being just safe for dogs additives. Other specialized treats, like Greenies, may be specifically designed for dog's dental health, so they will contain a lot more.
Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!

Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.


such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :)
This post totally cracked me up! Mainly because I have been thinking of making little pup treats for 2 weeks now. I’ve been hooked on Diane’s Gingie cookies (see OvenHug for the best gingie recipe eh=vah) and making them non-stop. Our finicky little chihuahua mix loves sharing bites with me. I want to make a gluten free version of my gingies so that our senior pup, Oscar can also join us – he has sensitive tummy issues. I just need to find a bone shaped cookie cutter and we’re in business. Thanks for the laughs. Your pup cookies look amazin’! Thanks for sharing. xo
Easter Baba (or babka, or babka wielkanocna) has graced Easter tables for Polish families for centuries — along with mazurek cookies, painted eggs, and cheese desserts. The backstory is this: The dessert was originally said to be made in pans that resembled a tall Bundt pan, but without the hole in the center. One medieval recipe claims that their special version — which calls for 24 eggs and 1 tablespoon of freshly pounded vanilla beans that are beaten for more than an hour (!
Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]
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