It’s Earth Day — or Earth Month, as we prefer! — so naturally, we’re turning our focus to the kitchen. And specifically ways we can create less waste and be more efficient and thoughtful with our output. Between packaging and food scraps, some degree of kitchen waste feels inevitable. For most, there’s no way to eliminate it entirely, but there are a lot of small and easy ways to limit the amount of waste coming out of our kitchens.

such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :)
Studies show that treat time is much more exciting for a dog when he has to do something to earn it.5 For example, you can use healthy dog treats as an incentive to exercise more, solve a puzzle (such as figuring out how to get a treat that’s inside a toy), or simply behave better. Most experts recommend that you give your dog a treat for actually accomplishing something, rather than just hand it out randomly.

Hi Christi, I actually came here baking advice. Your cookies look awesome. I make my own also and am trying to make a business out of it but I’m having trouble as I am a real amatuer baker. My ingredients are 3 cups wheat flour, 2 tsp baking powder, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup chicken broth, 1/2 cup rolled oats, 1/4 sweet potato and 1 cup of pumkin. Bake 350 for 1/2 hr then rest in cooling oven 1 hr. They come out crunchy like i want but easilly broken. When rolling out the dough it is very dry and big cracks around the edge. Very labor intensive to get a batch baked!
Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
Studies show that treat time is much more exciting for a dog when he has to do something to earn it.5 For example, you can use healthy dog treats as an incentive to exercise more, solve a puzzle (such as figuring out how to get a treat that’s inside a toy), or simply behave better. Most experts recommend that you give your dog a treat for actually accomplishing something, rather than just hand it out randomly.
Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.

Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.
First, preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Then chop the liver into small pieces and place into the food processor, along with the egg and potato flakes. Pulse to blend, and add the broth as necessary to keep the mixture thin enough to spread into the baking pan. Bake for 25 minutes, cool for 5, and then empty the pan onto the wire rack. When the cake is completely cool, cut into small squares and let your pup enjoy!
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :)

my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
Since I first made this quick and easy dog biscuit recipe, I’ve done a lot of experimenting. While this is a great starter recipe (since it’s made from only 3 ingredients that you probably have in your kitchen right now), don’t forget to scroll through my other recipes. I make everything from gluten-free snacks to frozen treats to help your pooch beat the heat! 

The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!

Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
Nothing could possibly be simpler, or meatier, than this treat from Emmy's Best. It's the last but not least option on our best healthy dog treats list that is made of only one ingredient – USDA-certified, Grade A chicken breasts. These thin strips had been dehydrated, preserved naturally, and packed with the natural goodness of pure meat for dogs to relish. They make for a great incentive for dogs undergoing training, or for supplementing their diet. This is a product of the USA and guaranteed free of additives or preservatives.
As with many products, price comparisons confirm that pet owners can find these fourth best healthy dog treats for a better price on Amazon and a few other online retailers than in a lot of brick and mortar pet stores. As with many other pet-related products, it's easy to spot reviews where dog owners say that their dogs would not eat these healthy pet treats, but that group seems to be very small for these specific pet treats. Other than that, we could not find any other negative feedback.

These best healthy dog treats are made in the USA and do not include artificial preservatives or common fillers, such as soy, wheat, corn, and gluten, that are found in many regular dog treats. Each bag of these gourmet dog treats contains approximately 25 sticks that are 7” to 8” long, which may be given whole or broken into pieces for smaller breeds.


The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
My 145 pound Mellow (German Shepherd) is soooo spoiled and handles it with charm and drooly kisses. He gets treats for being the doorbell and official greeter. No bone cookie cutter big enough but I have a huge yard sale collection from a year or ten collecting. Not a fan of scary clowns so I took large round clown and made large yummy treats. Mellow loves them and I have to maintain control of the treat door. Funny look at first but buried one in his bed, dug it out later and is now sure they are wonderful. Thanks. (my vet says small garlic amounts ok–powder not salt is best). It is some wheat recipe treats!
Worst. Recipe. Ever. If You make this as written, expect to triple your dry ingredients. My Revision would be this: omit the water completely, use only 1-2 tablespoons of oil and only 1 egg. IF it’s too dry to mix, add some water a tablespoon at a time to make the dough more pliable. I ended up using ALL of my remaining flour, flax, wheat germ AND a whole whack of rolled oats and it’s still really soft. The dogs probably won’t be able to taste the comparably tiny amount of pumpkin and applesauce in it at all.

If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.


“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”

Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
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