Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :)
Sorry Debi, but your reference from natural society is completely off the mark with regard to peanut butter containing harmful carcinogens. As the owner of Jazz & Eddie’s Spice Trading Co., I have been making peanut butter treats for my rescues for nearly 20 years and have NEVER had a cancer incident traced back to peanut butter. I have researched the various natural alternatives to store bought including the BEST medicinal/healthy herbs and spices and peanut butter has never been tagged as a cancer-causing supplement EXCEPT (and as is with humans) those animals who may have a disposition for allergies or cancer traits. I absolutely appreciate the fact you are concerned about your pet’s health, but making such a broad-stroke comment like this about peanut butter is way off the mark. Here’s a simple recipe I use for my dog’s “KONG”‘s that are not only healthy but delicious! (And YES, I lick the whisk and spoon when I’m finished making it!):
These bone-shaped treats also do not contain any preservatives, artificial flavoring, artificial coloring, sugar or salt. Pet owners who live healthy lifestyles and practice healthy eating habits are very satisfied to find a product for their pets that is aligned to their own food choices. Their canine companions can now enjoy healthy and organic snacks, which are not only tasty but also a good source of carbohydrates, minerals, and proteins.
It’s best not to feed hard treats like this to dogs because they’re hard to digest and are not a natural food for them. They don’t digest grains and flour. It causes digestive problems and aggravates health conditions like allergies and seizures. Peanuts and peanut butter contain aflotoxins which cause cancer. People and animals are advised NOT to eat both items.
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉

These best healthy dog treats are made in the USA and do not include artificial preservatives or common fillers, such as soy, wheat, corn, and gluten, that are found in many regular dog treats. Each bag of these gourmet dog treats contains approximately 25 sticks that are 7” to 8” long, which may be given whole or broken into pieces for smaller breeds.
Once you mix all of your ingredients together (oats, homemade chicken broth or water, and an egg), you will use your hands to form a dough ball. Note: Your dough ball will be sticky! If you’ve ever worked with a sticky dough before, you know it can get a bit messy at times. That’s why, to make the dough easier to work with, I let mine sit for 15 minutes. This allowed the dough to dry out a bit. If you use a rolling pin and cookie cutter to shape your treats, you might also want to sprinkle a little oat flour on your countertop (or whatever surface you’re spreading your dough onto), as well as on top of the dough ball before you begin rolling it flat. 
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
In the south of England it is much the fashion to give sporting-dogs a food called dog-biscuit instead of barley-meal, and the consequences resulting from this simple aliment are most gratifying. Barley-meal, indeed, is an unnatural food, unless it be varied with bones, for a dog delights to gnaw, and thus to exercise those potent teeth with which nature has furnished him ; his stomach, too, is. designed to digest the hard and tough integument of animal substance; hence, barleymeal, as a principal portion of his subsistence, is by no means to be desired. In small private families it is not always possible to ohtain a sufficiency of meat and bones for the sustenance of a dog, and recourse is too frequently had to a coarse and filthy aliment, which is highly objectionable, especially if the creature be debarred from taking daily exercise, fettered by a chain, and restricted, by situation, from obtaining access to grass ; and no one who has not watched the habits of our faithful allies (as we have done), can be aware of the absolute necessity which exists for his obtaining a constant supply of it. If no other good effect resulted from it than the sleekness of his coat and clearness of his skin, these benefits ought to the procured for him; but when his health and comfort are to be also ensured, who, that has a grain of benevolence in his disposition, would hesitate to perform so simple and gratifying an act of duty?
Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.

I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
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