My dog has had seizures and I worry about EVERYTHING! I use whole wheat and coconut flour for my dog cookies. The coconut flour is just SOOO dry with a cornmeal texture though, but because my husband on a new diet, I use ground pecans for pie crust for his sugar free cheese cake, and she has no problem with the pecans. This sounds like we should try a new experiment! (keeping in mind of course that the pecans have a high oil content)
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.

My comment is based on facts, not that “giving treats is good for dogs.” No, only the correct food is good for dogs and the only correct diet for dogs is raw meat and bones. They don’t eat flour, make fire, bake anything…Poor and incorrect food along with vaccines is responsible for the poor health and shorter lives dogs have had for the last several decades. Before vaccines and “pet foods” dogs averageed life was 25 to 30 yrs without all these diseases they have now. Facts only are what’s important, not what people think or feel.

Below we'll discuss more on how to choose the best dog treats that are healthy and we've used tips and advice from veterinarians and guidelines from several studies and University websites to come up with ranking factors for the best healthy dog treats, and after analyzing hundreds of them, managed to find nine options that fit the bill. Here are the top five picks, with more following down below:
In the south of England it is much the fashion to give sporting-dogs a food called dog-biscuit instead of barley-meal, and the consequences resulting from this simple aliment are most gratifying. Barley-meal, indeed, is an unnatural food, unless it be varied with bones, for a dog delights to gnaw, and thus to exercise those potent teeth with which nature has furnished him ; his stomach, too, is. designed to digest the hard and tough integument of animal substance; hence, barleymeal, as a principal portion of his subsistence, is by no means to be desired. In small private families it is not always possible to ohtain a sufficiency of meat and bones for the sustenance of a dog, and recourse is too frequently had to a coarse and filthy aliment, which is highly objectionable, especially if the creature be debarred from taking daily exercise, fettered by a chain, and restricted, by situation, from obtaining access to grass ; and no one who has not watched the habits of our faithful allies (as we have done), can be aware of the absolute necessity which exists for his obtaining a constant supply of it. If no other good effect resulted from it than the sleekness of his coat and clearness of his skin, these benefits ought to the procured for him; but when his health and comfort are to be also ensured, who, that has a grain of benevolence in his disposition, would hesitate to perform so simple and gratifying an act of duty?
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”

It’s also common to find by-products and fillers (check the labels of any treats you might have in the cupboard) in dog biscuits rather than natural, organic or high-quality ingredients. When you make small batches of your own doggie biscuits, there’s no need for extra additives or preservatives, another great reason to tie on an apron and get creative in the kitchen.
As you can see from the reviews above, customers agree that even the pickiest of dogs love any type of organic dog treats, but are even more eager to please when offered Rocco & Roxie Supply Co treats over others. Although the price tag is a deterrent for some, others insist that these best healthy dog treats are worth the cost on account of the value of the product and these being USDA organic certified treats. Customers appreciate the fact that these natural dog treats do not leave the typical smell and grease on their hands, and, unlike other treats, the jerky sticks actually smell very pleasant according to most.

Dog food – Yep, plain old dog food also works great as a treat. If you typically feed him dry food, a couple of pieces of kibble will help satisfy those cravings your canine might be experiencing between meals. Dogs usually don’t care a whole lot about what kind of treat they get, just as long as they get something. You’ll be surprised just how effective dog food can be.

Pumpkin is known as a remedy for a dog’s upset stomach, but it’s also great for healthy dog treats. Put a tablespoon of canned pumpkin in your dog’s bowl and you’ll be amazed at how fast it disappears. Pumpkin — since it contains A LOT of fiber — is a great way to fight both diarrhea and constipation. So if your pup is having bathroom troubles, try a little pumpkin. Plus, it has other healthy ingredients like vitamin A (great for eyesight), potassium (which promotes healthy nerves and muscles), and many other important ingredients. But remember: Since too much vitamin A can be toxic to dogs, don’t make pumpkin a regular part of your pup’s diet.
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