Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
Next, look for the calorie count of each treat. Manufacturers of healthy treats want you to know just how good their product is, and most are happy to advertise the calories per treat. This is important because it’s easy to overlook that that those calories add up over the course of a day, so even if the treat is healthy if you give too many it becomes unhealthy.
My comment is based on facts, not that “giving treats is good for dogs.” No, only the correct food is good for dogs and the only correct diet for dogs is raw meat and bones. They don’t eat flour, make fire, bake anything…Poor and incorrect food along with vaccines is responsible for the poor health and shorter lives dogs have had for the last several decades. Before vaccines and “pet foods” dogs averageed life was 25 to 30 yrs without all these diseases they have now. Facts only are what’s important, not what people think or feel.
Yes, you can. Just like the answer about peanut butter above, some dogs can be allergic to things like gluten found in regular flour. Whole wheat flour can have some more nutrients which is always great, or you can use an alternative flour like coconut flour. I always recommend letting your dog sample a small amount before giving them lots of treats, because dogs can be allergic to anything, just like people!
Plato has produced another meat-based treat that is all-organic and all-natural. This one is made from duck meat, brown rice, natural preservatives and citric acid. It is fortified with vitamins E and C as well. Duck meat is a great protein alternative for dogs that react to other meats, such as chicken. This food product contains 30% crude protein, fats, fiber, iron and zinc.

That being said, the ingredients below avoid any products that are well-known doggie no-nos (like, say, chocolate!) and focus on ingredients that are generally accepted as good for doggie-dom. Just like with human food, it depends on the individual. Your dog might be allergic to wheat or eggs or pumpkin or something else. So keep a close eye on your puppy any time you give them a new food or treat. Even though these dog treats are formulated to be as gentle on their systems and give them as many added nutritional benefits as possible, they still might not agree with some pooches.
Pumpkin is known as a remedy for a dog’s upset stomach, but it’s also great for healthy dog treats. Put a tablespoon of canned pumpkin in your dog’s bowl and you’ll be amazed at how fast it disappears. Pumpkin — since it contains A LOT of fiber — is a great way to fight both diarrhea and constipation. So if your pup is having bathroom troubles, try a little pumpkin. Plus, it has other healthy ingredients like vitamin A (great for eyesight), potassium (which promotes healthy nerves and muscles), and many other important ingredients. But remember: Since too much vitamin A can be toxic to dogs, don’t make pumpkin a regular part of your pup’s diet.
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