Top Dog Tips is here to provide dog owners with the most accurate and in-depth tips and advice on dog care, health, nutrition and training from the industry experts – veterinarians, dog trainers, groomers and animal scientists. We help dog owners effortlessly choose the best dog supplies on the market. We buy, test, review and rank pet products to help you avoid the bad stuff and purchase only what's best for you and your dog.
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) provides a list of dental chews that can go a long way toward knocking off the tartar and plaque that can build up in your dog’s mouth over time.1 This can lead to a wide range of problems, such as gum disease and oral infections. Unless you have a regimen of brushing your dog’s teeth every night, or go to your vet for regular cleanings, dental chews are healthy dog treats and are the best way to help ensure your canine’s oral health is as good as it can be.
Not all pets and pet owners who tried these seventh best healthy treats for dogs went nuts over them, though. There were those who would have preferred a treat without molasses, but admit that this is a convenient alternative for time consuming homemade treats. The biggest selling points of this treat are its organic and natural ingredients and its obvious appeal to dogs. Buyers also consider it safe, coming from a trusted brand.
Worst. Recipe. Ever. If You make this as written, expect to triple your dry ingredients. My Revision would be this: omit the water completely, use only 1-2 tablespoons of oil and only 1 egg. IF it’s too dry to mix, add some water a tablespoon at a time to make the dough more pliable. I ended up using ALL of my remaining flour, flax, wheat germ AND a whole whack of rolled oats and it’s still really soft. The dogs probably won’t be able to taste the comparably tiny amount of pumpkin and applesauce in it at all.

Skip the store-bought dog treats and go homemade with these healthy, yummy dog treat recipes. With just a few key ingredients, you can make homemade dog treats right in your kitchen. From dog biscuits to Martha's special dog food, your dog will love these tasty treat recipes.Your dog won't be able to resist chowing down on these edible bones. Personalize them with decorations and by writing his or her name on the dough before baking.
I’m super late to the dog baking party, but reading through the comments, I see no one else offered a coconut flour tip… I made these last night, and the dough was way too crumby with the same amount of coconut flour as wheat flour. I read up on it, you should only use 20% of the amount of regular flour, and then add the same amount of liquid. When I made these cookies I ended up adding an extra egg and about 1/4 cup extra water. Mind you I actually halved the recipe. It was kind of dry and hard to work with, and my cookies were not hard or crunchy. 3 dogs in the house, and they all looked like Cookie Monster eating these, so they obviously didn’t care. I just wouldn’t give them away as gifts this batch, because the crumby dough baked into cookies with cracks that fall apart easily. :)
Once you mix all of your ingredients together (oats, homemade chicken broth or water, and an egg), you will use your hands to form a dough ball. Note: Your dough ball will be sticky! If you’ve ever worked with a sticky dough before, you know it can get a bit messy at times. That’s why, to make the dough easier to work with, I let mine sit for 15 minutes. This allowed the dough to dry out a bit. If you use a rolling pin and cookie cutter to shape your treats, you might also want to sprinkle a little oat flour on your countertop (or whatever surface you’re spreading your dough onto), as well as on top of the dough ball before you begin rolling it flat. 

As more pet owners are becoming conscious of their pets' health and what important role the diet plays, manufacturers too are starting to pay more attention and produce only the best healthy dog treats with organic and natural ingredients, that are low in calories. In 2018, there is a lot more to choose than there was a year ago. In fact, some studies have found that now it's better to stick with commercial healthy treats for dogs than homemade treats because they're nutritionally well-optimized for dogs.
Bully Sticks are popular options because they are made form 100% beef tendon. The best and healthiest bully sticks are made from US or Brazilian beef that is grass-raised and free from the use of antibiotics or growth promoters. Being high in protein, each bully stick has nutrition value and just be aware of this so you don’t accidentally give too many calories.
Not all pets and pet owners who tried these seventh best healthy treats for dogs went nuts over them, though. There were those who would have preferred a treat without molasses, but admit that this is a convenient alternative for time consuming homemade treats. The biggest selling points of this treat are its organic and natural ingredients and its obvious appeal to dogs. Buyers also consider it safe, coming from a trusted brand.
my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.
In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
Last but not least, pay attention to the ingredient quality. The best healthy dog treats will usually have less ingredients than your average dog food brand, with the first being some type of animal meat source. For example, the first best healthy dog treats brand is Rocco & Roxie, and only contains beef as the main ingredient, with the rest being just safe for dogs additives. Other specialized treats, like Greenies, may be specifically designed for dog's dental health, so they will contain a lot more.
Dried apricots are other healthy dog treats, as long as your dog eats them in moderation. They’re filled with fiber as well as many other nutrients that help your dog’s immune system. These nutrients include beta-carotene, which is good for vision, and potassium, which helps improve muscle and bone health. Never give the pit of an apricot (or any food) to a dog, because it’s a choking hazard and could be poisonous.
As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.
Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.

I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.


By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.
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