One of the pleasures of cooking a ham for a large gathering, obviously outside of eating it, is that the city hams we glaze and bake for holidays are already cooked. This should take the guesswork out of cooking a ham at home, right? But because most hams are quite large and have spiral cuts and giant bones to contend with, it can be hard to tell when a ham is actually “done” cooking. Here’s everything you need to know about ham temperatures for reheating and serving.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.
I would love to make these for my dogs! We feed our dogs a raw diet, but unfortunately our Miniature Schnauzer ended up getting pancreatitis (they are prone to it) because of too much fat in his diet. Now, he’s still on raw – just a lower fat diet, but we can’t give him any treats like this anymore – no matter how awesome they sound. Our other dog would LOVE these though. 😉
My 145 pound Mellow (German Shepherd) is soooo spoiled and handles it with charm and drooly kisses. He gets treats for being the doorbell and official greeter. No bone cookie cutter big enough but I have a huge yard sale collection from a year or ten collecting. Not a fan of scary clowns so I took large round clown and made large yummy treats. Mellow loves them and I have to maintain control of the treat door. Funny look at first but buried one in his bed, dug it out later and is now sure they are wonderful. Thanks. (my vet says small garlic amounts ok–powder not salt is best). It is some wheat recipe treats!

Meet my new favorite brunch dish: Hawaiian Roll Egg-in-a Hole. You might be familiar with egg-in-a-hole as a beloved childhood breakfast dish, but this version is easier to cook for a crowd, and delivers big on flavor. Serve this egg bake for family brunch, or whip it up when you’re feeding a hungry crowd. Here are my tricks for nailing it every time. At first glance, this recipe is pretty straightforward: Make a well in each roll, crack in an egg, and bake!

If you have yet to meet the drop dinner, it’s about time you introduced yourself. The concept? Dump a handful of things into a slow cooker or Instant Pot and let the appliance do all the work. Sure, you may have to chop up a few vegetables or sear a piece of meat in the Instant Pot, but really there’s no work for you beyond that besides grabbing the plates and forks.

I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.

By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.


No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.
I’ve been making these for a long time now. My dog, Lola, knows by the smell when I’m baking for her and is in the kitchen the whole time! To make it easier, I use a pizza cutter and make 1x3” long strips instead of the bone shape. It is much faster with less rolling and these strips fit very nicely into Lola’s Kong. I use all natural peanut butter, and if I remember, get it freshly ground at the grocery store. I also buy the real Ceylon cinnamon to avoid any coumarin overdose if I give her too many treats.
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.

As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.

My dog has had seizures and I worry about EVERYTHING! I use whole wheat and coconut flour for my dog cookies. The coconut flour is just SOOO dry with a cornmeal texture though, but because my husband on a new diet, I use ground pecans for pie crust for his sugar free cheese cake, and she has no problem with the pecans. This sounds like we should try a new experiment! (keeping in mind of course that the pecans have a high oil content)
Dried apricots are other healthy dog treats, as long as your dog eats them in moderation. They’re filled with fiber as well as many other nutrients that help your dog’s immune system. These nutrients include beta-carotene, which is good for vision, and potassium, which helps improve muscle and bone health. Never give the pit of an apricot (or any food) to a dog, because it’s a choking hazard and could be poisonous.
such a good question. I was actually just looking into this for someone on facebook. I’m going to keep doing some research…but initial thoughts would be oatmeal and some kind of brown rice flour or there’s also oat flour. you could also use quinoa flour or flax meal. I’m going to do some more looking into where you can purchase those items. thanks so much for the question! def want to keep the doggies out there feeling good :) 
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