Sorry Debi, but your reference from natural society is completely off the mark with regard to peanut butter containing harmful carcinogens. As the owner of Jazz & Eddie’s Spice Trading Co., I have been making peanut butter treats for my rescues for nearly 20 years and have NEVER had a cancer incident traced back to peanut butter. I have researched the various natural alternatives to store bought including the BEST medicinal/healthy herbs and spices and peanut butter has never been tagged as a cancer-causing supplement EXCEPT (and as is with humans) those animals who may have a disposition for allergies or cancer traits. I absolutely appreciate the fact you are concerned about your pet’s health, but making such a broad-stroke comment like this about peanut butter is way off the mark. Here’s a simple recipe I use for my dog’s “KONG”‘s that are not only healthy but delicious! (And YES, I lick the whisk and spoon when I’m finished making it!):
On Wednesday last, in the Quean's Bench Division of the High Court, before Lord Coleridge and a special jury. Spratt's Patent Company claimed an injunction against a Mr. Warnett, a general dealer at St. Albans, who, they alleged, was selling as theirs certain meat biscuits for dogs not of their manufacture. They also asked for an account of profits, and damages and costs.

“I think it’s helpful to think about why you’re using treats and what message you intend and what behavior you want to reinforce,” she says. “If you give treats willy-nilly all over the place for no apparent reason, that can be detrimental because you may be giving too many treats and your pet may become overweight, but you also lose the opportunity to set up certain [behavioral] expectations.”
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
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Fantastic list! I loved every recipe, until I read #23. I don’t care how little it is, bacon is not good for any animal (although it’s one of MY favorite foods and I’ll eat it, but I won’t give it to my dogs). I read one blogger justify bacon in their dog treat recipe by saying that for the number of treats that their recipe provided, one piece of bacon wasn’t going to hurt a dog. That may be true, but it’s not worth it. Boiled chicken might be used instead. I guarantee dogs would love it, and it would be safer for them. Just as a reminder, the American Kennel Club states:

In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]

Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.

Facts are important, Debi, but this article on “naturalsociety.com” does not provide any. It cites minimal references, none of which actually describe a definitive link between peanut consumption and cancer. I would instead refer to peer-reviewed literature, like this article http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/9/1757S.full.pdf+html, which indicates that the relationship is unclear, but possibly beneficial.
Dogs of various breeds love this biscuit, so it is a handy one to bring during training. There have been no reports of allergies or adverse reactions. There were very few dogs, however, that didn’t like the treat and preferred other brands. Overall, this is one of the best healthy treats for dogs available in pet supply and online stores now that's also USDA certified.
This homemade dog treat recipe is perfect for novice cooks (myself included). If you’re interested in making some super simple dog treats I’d recommend starting out with this easy recipe. The only ingredients you need are 2 cups of organic whole wheat flour and 2 jars of pureed baby food. For the baby food I’ve found Laika loves blueberry, beef and sweet potato.
You’ll want to preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit before starting. Then, dump 1 ¼ cups of PLAIN canned chickpeas into a bowl and mash them up until there aren’t any whole pieces left. Yes, it’s important to use plain, unseasoned chickpeas, because they’re the safest for your dog to eat. After, combine ½ cup of cooked rice (white or brown), and 4 tablespoons of canned pumpkin to the chickpeas. You can make them any size you like, smaller for training treats, bigger just for fun. Bake for about 30 minutes. For larger cookies, flip them after 20 minutes. Allow them to cool before feeding.
Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.
Thank you to the readers who have mentioned the issue with using bacon fat for dogs. A trace amount of bacon grease (two tablespoons divided amongst 30 biscuits = less than 1 gram of bacon fat per serving) shouldn’t be a concern. Of course, we’re not veterinarians over here, so please check with your vet or use an alternative type of oil if you are concerned.
Lifting the Cut Outs - Once you have cut out as many dog biscuits as you can, it's time to transfer the cookies to the baking sheet. Start by pulling away the excess dough from around the cut outs. Place the unused dough back into your bowl to be rolled out. Gently lift the cookie away from the parchment paper or flour covered surface with a metal or thin spatula.
In Spain, "pan de perro" is mentioned as early as 1623 in a play by Lope de Vega.[3] It is used here in the sense of giving someone blows; to "give dog's bread" to someone could mean anything from mistreating them to killing them.[4] The latter meaning refers to a special bread (also called zarazas) made with ground glass, poison and needles and intended to kill dogs.[5]
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