Prep for these chews is easy. Set your oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Slice your sweet potato length-wise, no thicker than ⅓ of an inch. Lay them on a baking sheet, lined with parchment paper if you have it, and bake for 1 ½ hours. Flip the chews over and bake for another 1 ½ hours. Let them cool before giving them to your dog, and store them in the fridge.
Healthy dog treats reviews from pet owners: “I tried these out while I was visiting my daughter in Wisconsin. My dog has food allergies and this is the first treat that she has been able to eat in addition to her $94 a bag prescription dog food. This organic treat is her favorite out of all treats she has tried and she can have these as long as they work!…”

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Farcas says there’s another plus side to treating dogs with fruits and vegetables: fewer calories. “Often giving fresh fruits and vegetables is fewer calories than providing cookie-type, commercial treats,” she says. “Since there’s a tendency to over-provide treats to our pets and there’s a trend of obesity in our pets, I think that is an important concern.”
Welcome to Next Week’s Meal Plan! I want to help you find inspiration and ease some of the pain points that come with getting dinner on the table night after night, whether you’re cooking for one or a family of eight. That’s why, as promised, this series is shifting — every week I’ll be answering reader requests and sharing meal plans that you want to see.It’s not too late! What type of meal plans would you like to see?
In 1860, still in England, Spratt unveiled Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes, a combination of wheat, beetroot, vegetables, and beef blood. Before long, he had competitors with names like Dr. A. C. Daniels' Medicated Dog Bread and F. H. Bennett's Malatoid Dog Biscuits. The products embraced the dubious science and the lightly regulated hucksterism of their era. (2009)[14]
“I think it’s helpful to think about why you’re using treats and what message you intend and what behavior you want to reinforce,” she says. “If you give treats willy-nilly all over the place for no apparent reason, that can be detrimental because you may be giving too many treats and your pet may become overweight, but you also lose the opportunity to set up certain [behavioral] expectations.”
Worst. Recipe. Ever. If You make this as written, expect to triple your dry ingredients. My Revision would be this: omit the water completely, use only 1-2 tablespoons of oil and only 1 egg. IF it’s too dry to mix, add some water a tablespoon at a time to make the dough more pliable. I ended up using ALL of my remaining flour, flax, wheat germ AND a whole whack of rolled oats and it’s still really soft. The dogs probably won’t be able to taste the comparably tiny amount of pumpkin and applesauce in it at all.
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]

“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
The point of homemade dog treats is to stay away from preservatives, chemicals, dyes and all the other nonsense. Be smart. Do extensive research on the ingredients you wish to use and the alternative to each of them. Even if you think your dog has a ‘tolerance’ for milk, you should use it regardless unless you 100% know of any additives. In that case I just take milk right out of the equation. Theres no need for it anyway.
This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.

Skip the store-bought dog treats and go homemade with these healthy, yummy dog treat recipes. With just a few key ingredients, you can make homemade dog treats right in your kitchen. From dog biscuits to Martha's special dog food, your dog will love these tasty treat recipes.Your dog won't be able to resist chowing down on these edible bones. Personalize them with decorations and by writing his or her name on the dough before baking.
Below we'll discuss more on how to choose the best dog treats that are healthy and we've used tips and advice from veterinarians and guidelines from several studies and University websites to come up with ranking factors for the best healthy dog treats, and after analyzing hundreds of them, managed to find nine options that fit the bill. Here are the top five picks, with more following down below:
Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.
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