Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.

Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.

In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]
Plato has produced another meat-based treat that is all-organic and all-natural. This one is made from duck meat, brown rice, natural preservatives and citric acid. It is fortified with vitamins E and C as well. Duck meat is a great protein alternative for dogs that react to other meats, such as chicken. This food product contains 30% crude protein, fats, fiber, iron and zinc.

These best healthy dog treats are made in the USA and do not include artificial preservatives or common fillers, such as soy, wheat, corn, and gluten, that are found in many regular dog treats. Each bag of these gourmet dog treats contains approximately 25 sticks that are 7” to 8” long, which may be given whole or broken into pieces for smaller breeds.
And as far as taste goes, I didn’t try ’em out (although I could, because it’s all human food), but our puppers love them. Rory in particular will literally stand in front of the cabinet that holds these treats and whine at the door, hoping that it’ll magically open and the whole bag of treats will spill onto the floor. She’s a big fan. And I’m a big fan of knowing all the ingredients and of saving a pretty penny by making these over the high-quality, all-natural treats I have been buying her.
As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.
In terms of what to avoid, start with any artificial additives and agents that are known to cause health problems in dogs. For example, food dyes are unnecessary when choosing the best healthy dog treats and so is glycerin (a preservative), because some studies have shown their dangers. Also, while some dog treats brands still use these, BHT and BHA preservatives may be harmful, according to some experts. That said, some other preservatives can and should be used to avoid spoilage, but only as long as they have been proven to be safe for dogs. Vitamin E and Vitamin C are some of those few that are allowed.
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
×