Homemade Dog Treats are the best way to show your pet that you love them like family! These Homemade Peanut Butter Dog Treats are an easy dog biscuit recipe that your fur baby would request every week if they could. If you’ve wondered How To Make Dog Treats, it’s much easier than you think. Your dog deserves these homemade treats and will be so excited! 
The more treats you feed your dog, the fewer calories those treats should have! The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention suggests that a dog weighing around 50 pounds should get 700-900 calories a day. A few low-calorie treats here and there shouldn’t have much of an impact on your dog’s health or weight, but treats should not make up the bulk of your pet’s daily calories.4

Greenies healthy treats for dogs relieve pet owners from having to search for homemade dog treats recipes due to their rigorous testing and quality control. These doggy chews serve as a way to promote healthier teeth and gums, fight tartar, plaque, bad breath, and add vitamins and minerals to a dog’s daily diet. These second best healthy dog treats are available in jumbo, large, regular, petite, and tiny “styles” and in five different size packages (6, 12, 18, 27, and 36 ounces).
When preparing homemade dog treats, make sure you take into account any allergies that your pet has to specific ingredients. You will want to avoid adding any ingredient that you know that your pet has reacted poorly to in the past. If you are experimenting with new flavors, feed the treat to your dog in a small amount to see how he reacts to it before distributing an entire treat. Store your homemade dog treats in an airtight container and place them in the freezer. Allow the treat to thaw for 10 – 20 minutes prior to serving to your dog. Treats can last for up to 6 months in the freezer.
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
Studies show that treat time is much more exciting for a dog when he has to do something to earn it.5 For example, you can use healthy dog treats as an incentive to exercise more, solve a puzzle (such as figuring out how to get a treat that’s inside a toy), or simply behave better. Most experts recommend that you give your dog a treat for actually accomplishing something, rather than just hand it out randomly.
Easter Baba (or babka, or babka wielkanocna) has graced Easter tables for Polish families for centuries — along with mazurek cookies, painted eggs, and cheese desserts. The backstory is this: The dessert was originally said to be made in pans that resembled a tall Bundt pan, but without the hole in the center. One medieval recipe claims that their special version — which calls for 24 eggs and 1 tablespoon of freshly pounded vanilla beans that are beaten for more than an hour (!
Sorry Debi, but your reference from natural society is completely off the mark with regard to peanut butter containing harmful carcinogens. As the owner of Jazz & Eddie’s Spice Trading Co., I have been making peanut butter treats for my rescues for nearly 20 years and have NEVER had a cancer incident traced back to peanut butter. I have researched the various natural alternatives to store bought including the BEST medicinal/healthy herbs and spices and peanut butter has never been tagged as a cancer-causing supplement EXCEPT (and as is with humans) those animals who may have a disposition for allergies or cancer traits. I absolutely appreciate the fact you are concerned about your pet’s health, but making such a broad-stroke comment like this about peanut butter is way off the mark. Here’s a simple recipe I use for my dog’s “KONG”‘s that are not only healthy but delicious! (And YES, I lick the whisk and spoon when I’m finished making it!):
Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
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