In the south of England it is much the fashion to give sporting-dogs a food called dog-biscuit instead of barley-meal, and the consequences resulting from this simple aliment are most gratifying. Barley-meal, indeed, is an unnatural food, unless it be varied with bones, for a dog delights to gnaw, and thus to exercise those potent teeth with which nature has furnished him ; his stomach, too, is. designed to digest the hard and tough integument of animal substance; hence, barleymeal, as a principal portion of his subsistence, is by no means to be desired. In small private families it is not always possible to ohtain a sufficiency of meat and bones for the sustenance of a dog, and recourse is too frequently had to a coarse and filthy aliment, which is highly objectionable, especially if the creature be debarred from taking daily exercise, fettered by a chain, and restricted, by situation, from obtaining access to grass ; and no one who has not watched the habits of our faithful allies (as we have done), can be aware of the absolute necessity which exists for his obtaining a constant supply of it. If no other good effect resulted from it than the sleekness of his coat and clearness of his skin, these benefits ought to the procured for him; but when his health and comfort are to be also ensured, who, that has a grain of benevolence in his disposition, would hesitate to perform so simple and gratifying an act of duty?
I didn’t realize you could make dog treats with only 2 ingredients, That’s awesome! All of the recipes sound great. I read some of the other posts, and I’m borrowing one of the ideas. My daughter is in a Girl Scout troop and her troop’s project is to volunteer at a shelter. I will check with the shelter and see if we can bring homemade treats. Thanks for all of the ideas!
The sixth best healthy dog treats choice is another USDA certified option on this list. You can order these dog treats in three flavors – cheddar, peanut butter, and pumpkin. And what better food for dogs is there than one made with human-grade ingredients? No corn, wheat, artificial flavors, preservatives, dairy or animal by-products went into the preparation of these dog treats from Wet Noses. Each pack contains 14 ounces of crunchy treats.
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
The more treats you feed your dog, the fewer calories those treats should have! The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention suggests that a dog weighing around 50 pounds should get 700-900 calories a day. A few low-calorie treats here and there shouldn’t have much of an impact on your dog’s health or weight, but treats should not make up the bulk of your pet’s daily calories.4

You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
We are entrusted with the care of our wonderful dogs. How could we ever give them anything but the best? Healthy dog treats are a great beginning to the many ways in which we care for and love our dogs. Just the fact that you want to bake for your dog shows that you understand the responsibility and pleasure of caring for your beloved companion. You're sure to find many recipes that help you do so in a healthy way.
By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.
These best healthy treats for dogs are great for snacks, rewards and training bait. They are definitely one of the best organic dog treats out there, too. Most customers who bought this product had dogs that couldn’t take chicken or other meat products without itching and losing hair. This non-GMO, organic and duck-based treat is also cheaper than many of the best healthy treats for dogs.
Skip the store-bought dog treats and go homemade with these healthy, yummy dog treat recipes. With just a few key ingredients, you can make homemade dog treats right in your kitchen. From dog biscuits to Martha's special dog food, your dog will love these tasty treat recipes.Your dog won't be able to resist chowing down on these edible bones. Personalize them with decorations and by writing his or her name on the dough before baking.
Dog allergies and other disorders brought about by the wrong food result to high vet costs, so buyers of Plato Original Duck Dog Treats were generally very grateful to find these on the market. Compared to fish treats, this variant does not have any smell, so it’s great for keeping inside the pocket when it’s being given as a surprise reward or used as a training treat.
Knead dough on a lightly floured surface for 2 minutes (dough will be sticky). Roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut out rounds using a 2-inch fluted cutter. Transfer to baking sheets. Make an indentation towards the bottom of 1 circle using your thumb, then press dough to make an arch of 4 small circles on top of the thumbprint using the tip of your pinky. Repeat with remaining rounds. Freeze for 15 minutes. Bake for 20 minutes, rotating sheets and lightly brushing with remaining 1/2 cup chicken stock halfway through. Turn oven off, and let stand in oven for 40 minutes.
The sweet potato is another human food that makes for healthy dog treats that your four-legged friend will love. It’s not only full of nutrients such as vitamins C and A that are great for skin and the immune system, it’s also a great source of fiber, which can make sure your dog’s digestive tract works properly. You can find sweet potato treats for dogs at your local pet store or make them at home. For a homemade touch, simply boil and puree some potatoes and put a spoonful or two in your dog’s bowl.
These bone-shaped treats also do not contain any preservatives, artificial flavoring, artificial coloring, sugar or salt. Pet owners who live healthy lifestyles and practice healthy eating habits are very satisfied to find a product for their pets that is aligned to their own food choices. Their canine companions can now enjoy healthy and organic snacks, which are not only tasty but also a good source of carbohydrates, minerals, and proteins.
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.

Most dog owners (or any pet owners!) would never just grab the first thing off the shelf when buying treats, but you need to make sure you read the labels carefully. All manufacturers are required to list all of their ingredients on the label – with the ones that are more prevalent at the top of the list. So look for products that have real meat at the top of the list – especially ones that are advertised as meat-flavored. For example, if you see a treat that says it’s beef-flavored, but beef is far down the list, look for something else.

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