In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]
Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.
Next, look for the calorie count of each treat. Manufacturers of healthy treats want you to know just how good their product is, and most are happy to advertise the calories per treat. This is important because it’s easy to overlook that that those calories add up over the course of a day, so even if the treat is healthy if you give too many it becomes unhealthy.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
These treats are great! I think I foolishly measured wrong so I had to end up putting more whole wheat flour in. I did the first batch and tasted them, tasted yummy! I decided to add more of a zing and put a blob of creamy peanut butter into the second batch. These are for our puppy that is arriving this Saturday. Thank you for this recipe it rocks!
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
×