Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]
My dog has had seizures and I worry about EVERYTHING! I use whole wheat and coconut flour for my dog cookies. The coconut flour is just SOOO dry with a cornmeal texture though, but because my husband on a new diet, I use ground pecans for pie crust for his sugar free cheese cake, and she has no problem with the pecans. This sounds like we should try a new experiment! (keeping in mind of course that the pecans have a high oil content)
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From the dog treat reviews above, you can see that customers agree that these premium dog treats are the perfect size for dog training (depending on the dog), although some customers choose to break them in two (pre-perforated) pieces when used as such. Dogs with digestive problems seem to eat these gourmet dog treats with no issue, which makes them a great option for canines with sensitive tummies.
Thankfully, Sage doesn’t have any special allergies or dietary needs, so there’s really no reason for me to make her homemade dog treats other than the fact that I love her something fierce and needed a break from cookies for a minute. But conveniently, this homemade dog treats recipe makes a TON and we know lots of other neighbor-ly dogs who can and will appreciate a little gift bag of soft-baked, peanut butter and bacon glazed homemade dog treats.
The healthy ingredients is what drew me to this recipe, however I had to add an additional 2 cups of flour (all purpose, since I only purchases the amount of whole wheat it calls for). The dough was still incredibly sticky and very difficult to roll out. I gave up after 1 sheet and put the rest in the fridge. I think the water needs to be reduced by half, and possibly more flour to make it workable. Hope this helps others in the future.

It’s best not to feed hard treats like this to dogs because they’re hard to digest and are not a natural food for them. They don’t digest grains and flour. It causes digestive problems and aggravates health conditions like allergies and seizures. Peanuts and peanut butter contain aflotoxins which cause cancer. People and animals are advised NOT to eat both items.
You’ll want to preheat your oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit before starting. Then, dump 1 ¼ cups of PLAIN canned chickpeas into a bowl and mash them up until there aren’t any whole pieces left. Yes, it’s important to use plain, unseasoned chickpeas, because they’re the safest for your dog to eat. After, combine ½ cup of cooked rice (white or brown), and 4 tablespoons of canned pumpkin to the chickpeas. You can make them any size you like, smaller for training treats, bigger just for fun. Bake for about 30 minutes. For larger cookies, flip them after 20 minutes. Allow them to cool before feeding.
Not sure what I did wrong but the dough turned out SOOOOO wet! I ended up adding another 1/2 cup of oats and another 1-1.5 cups of flour before I could work with it! And it was still very gummy. BUT I got it to work and they are now done. They hardened up well still. Just time to cool and let the pooch try them out! I’m sure he will love them but I’m just curious why my dough was so wet? Overall I’m still very happy with the base of this recipe and ingredients as some I’ve seen have me questioning if it’s a good idea to feed some of the ingredients to my pup. I did sub out canola oil for olive oil as well as I didnt have an canola!
This Easter we were gifted a 22-pound ham (!!!) and while we had our share of Easter feasts, we’ve still got a decent amount left over. I’m not even a little bit mad, because I know I can freeze some for future use and that there are plenty of ways — big and small — that we can use it up this week. Here are 17 of my favorite recipes for using up leftover ham. City hams freeze incredibly well. My suggestion? Freeze the ham in different forms for future use.
As with many products, price comparisons confirm that pet owners can find these fourth best healthy dog treats for a better price on Amazon and a few other online retailers than in a lot of brick and mortar pet stores. As with many other pet-related products, it's easy to spot reviews where dog owners say that their dogs would not eat these healthy pet treats, but that group seems to be very small for these specific pet treats. Other than that, we could not find any other negative feedback.
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.
Once you mix all of your ingredients together (oats, homemade chicken broth or water, and an egg), you will use your hands to form a dough ball. Note: Your dough ball will be sticky! If you’ve ever worked with a sticky dough before, you know it can get a bit messy at times. That’s why, to make the dough easier to work with, I let mine sit for 15 minutes. This allowed the dough to dry out a bit. If you use a rolling pin and cookie cutter to shape your treats, you might also want to sprinkle a little oat flour on your countertop (or whatever surface you’re spreading your dough onto), as well as on top of the dough ball before you begin rolling it flat. 
my daughter gave me a deer head/ applehead chiahihiau for a late chritmas present she will be 1 year old the end of july I am noticeing the she will not eat the store boughten treats so I thought I would try homemade treats im also noticeing she will not play with toys I think because she was mistreated befor I got her I keep trying thank you for listening
Thanks, and the reason for the discrepancy is because I’ve added a couple more recipes to this list recently. I did update the title and heading and in the body of the article itself, but I haven’t updated all the images yet (one of them says 22, and the one at the top still says 23). Thanks for the reminder, it’s something I’ve been meaning to get around to.

Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]
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