Healthy dog treats reviews from pet owners: “I tried these out while I was visiting my daughter in Wisconsin. My dog has food allergies and this is the first treat that she has been able to eat in addition to her $94 a bag prescription dog food. This organic treat is her favorite out of all treats she has tried and she can have these as long as they work!…”
From the dog treat reviews above, you can see that customers agree that these premium dog treats are the perfect size for dog training (depending on the dog), although some customers choose to break them in two (pre-perforated) pieces when used as such. Dogs with digestive problems seem to eat these gourmet dog treats with no issue, which makes them a great option for canines with sensitive tummies.

As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.


Deviled eggs are one of the most universally loved apps and snacks. Put a plate down at any holiday get-together or gathering and it’s all but guaranteed they’ll be gobbled up in no time. I’m a purist at heart who believes you can never go wrong with the classic creamy, mustard-spiked filling, although there’s a nearly endless variety of ways to dress up and reinvent these two-bite snacks. Here are 10 of our favorite deviled recipe ideas to consider.

Dog-biscuit is a hard and well-baked mass of coarse, yet clean and wholesome flour, of an inferior kind to that known as sailors' biscuit; and this latter substance, indeed, would be the best substitute for the former with which we are acquainted. A bag of dog-biscuit of five shillings' value, will be an ample supply for a yard-dog during the year: it should be soaked in water, or " pot liquor," for an hour or two ; and if no meat be at hand, a little dripping or lard may be added to it while softening, which will make a relishing meal at a trifling cost. We have for many years known the utility of the plan thus advocated, and we earnestly recommend all who value the safety of the community and their own (to say nothing of the happiness of the canine race), to make trial of the rational and feasible plan which we have detailed." (1841)[12]

By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.

You’ve been at this “business” a while and it would seem you have heard everything under the sun. As I read your comments above, I noticed how patient and kind you are with each person who comments, even if you’ve said the same thing a hundred times, lol. I’m in marketing, and I’m sure you’ve heard this before, but just wanted to point out that your heading and claim could be considered confusing. I landed on your page following a link, “25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” When I arrived on your page, the heading said “23 Simple Dog Treat Recipes: 5 Ingredients or less.” Perhaps most people wouldn’t notice that the information doesn’t match, but being a person of integrity, I thought you would want to be aware, so you could adjust the Headline to match the claim. Thank you for caring for those furry friends we love so much!
A caveat here: there are tons of (many times conflicting) reports about what and what not to feed your dog. Some people say milk is okay. Others say it’s a no-no. Some swear that garlic is a death sentence. Others say they’ve been feeding their dog garlic for years. Some feed their dogs only raw meat, others swear that’ll ruin your dog’s digestion. As with all decisions regarding the health of your loved ones, it’s probably best to check with a trained health care professional when introducing any kinds of new foods. A vet can give you a definitive “yes” or “no” on what should end up in your pup’s bowl.
Dog owners considering these third best healthy dog treats must know that Zuke’s company has recently been acquired by the conglomerate Nestle Purina, which raises concern for some pet owners. However, Zuke's ensures their customers and say they still work independently, and will stay true to their history of all natural dog treats and high levels of customer satisfaction by continuing to create the exact same products many dog owners are used to.
It may not be a good idea to stock up on several bags, as the main issue with this eight best healthy dog treats choice is that a few pet owners noticed some molds formed in the older bags. They may also become hard and dry the longer they are stocked, instead of soft and chewy like granola. Aside from that, pets just loved these treats, and owners feel assured that they’re nutritious and safe for their dogs.

Facts are important, Debi, but this article on “naturalsociety.com” does not provide any. It cites minimal references, none of which actually describe a definitive link between peanut consumption and cancer. I would instead refer to peer-reviewed literature, like this article http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/9/1757S.full.pdf+html, which indicates that the relationship is unclear, but possibly beneficial.


“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
It may not be a good idea to stock up on several bags, as the main issue with this eight best healthy dog treats choice is that a few pet owners noticed some molds formed in the older bags. They may also become hard and dry the longer they are stocked, instead of soft and chewy like granola. Aside from that, pets just loved these treats, and owners feel assured that they’re nutritious and safe for their dogs.
Worst. Recipe. Ever. If You make this as written, expect to triple your dry ingredients. My Revision would be this: omit the water completely, use only 1-2 tablespoons of oil and only 1 egg. IF it’s too dry to mix, add some water a tablespoon at a time to make the dough more pliable. I ended up using ALL of my remaining flour, flax, wheat germ AND a whole whack of rolled oats and it’s still really soft. The dogs probably won’t be able to taste the comparably tiny amount of pumpkin and applesauce in it at all.
This DIY recipe is super easy for any pet owner, and combines two already healthy treats into an exciting snack. You can simply dip a baby carrot into a teaspoon of natural peanut butter and voila! An easy treat. Another option is to use shredded carrots, combine them with peanut butter, and roll them into little balls. These peanut butter carrot balls can be fed fresh or frozen.

From the link above, you can read that many customers say that these gourmet dog treats work perfectly when used to train their dogs, and, because of the small size, they are easy to transport when going on walks or to the dog park. These grain free dog treats are said to last a long time, making the small price tag more than reasonable. Many customers point out that, when not sealed correctly, Zuke's natural dog treats will dry out and lose their moist texture; therefore, always be sure to seal the bag tightly!

I love this list! First time making dog treats, didn’t have all the ingredients for one recipe so I used this as inspiration. I used peanut butter, eggs, flour, honey, and vegetable broth to make soft, chewy dog biscuits and used a heart cookie cutter. My pugs & chihuahua, and my boyfriend’s goldens loved em! Even tried one myself heheh – turned out like lightly sweetened peanut butter cookies.
Dog allergies and other disorders brought about by the wrong food result to high vet costs, so buyers of Plato Original Duck Dog Treats were generally very grateful to find these on the market. Compared to fish treats, this variant does not have any smell, so it’s great for keeping inside the pocket when it’s being given as a surprise reward or used as a training treat.
It may not be a good idea to stock up on several bags, as the main issue with this eight best healthy dog treats choice is that a few pet owners noticed some molds formed in the older bags. They may also become hard and dry the longer they are stocked, instead of soft and chewy like granola. Aside from that, pets just loved these treats, and owners feel assured that they’re nutritious and safe for their dogs.
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
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