As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.

Don't get confused though – something that may look low calorie isn't necessarily that. For example, many thing that bully sticks, because of how they're manufactured, are low-calorie treats. That isn't so, and this has recently been found in a study by Dr Lisa Freeman, where they concluded that not only do they contain more calories than initially thought, but also some harmful bacteria (Freeman et al. 2013). You must check the official guaranteed analysis of dog treats that you buy to confirm the calorie content.
As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.
In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]

Frittatas have long been my go-to solution anytime I need to use up the sad-looking produce, wilting herbs, and little nubs of cheese in my fridge. It’s not often I make them with a plan — until now. Inspired by my favorite cheesy dip and the warm spring weather, I came up with a frittata loaded with garlicky marinated artichoke hearts, earthy baby spinach, salty Parm, and rich sour cream. I knew it would be good, but it went above and beyond all of my expectations.


Not all pets and pet owners who tried these seventh best healthy treats for dogs went nuts over them, though. There were those who would have preferred a treat without molasses, but admit that this is a convenient alternative for time consuming homemade treats. The biggest selling points of this treat are its organic and natural ingredients and its obvious appeal to dogs. Buyers also consider it safe, coming from a trusted brand.


Wheat Flour, Wheat Gluten, Glycerin, Gelatin, Oat Fiber, Water, Lecithin, Natural Poultry Flavor, Minerals (Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Selenium, Potassium Iodide), Dried Apple Pomace, Choline Chloride, Fruit Juice Color, Vitamins ( Dl-Alpha Tocopherol Acetate [Source Of Vitamin E], Vitamin B12 Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate [Vitamin B5], Niacin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement [Vitamin B2], Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride [Vitamin B6], Thiamine Mononitrate [Vitamin B1], Folic Acid), Turmeric Color.

Facts are important, Debi, but this article on “naturalsociety.com” does not provide any. It cites minimal references, none of which actually describe a definitive link between peanut consumption and cancer. I would instead refer to peer-reviewed literature, like this article http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/9/1757S.full.pdf+html, which indicates that the relationship is unclear, but possibly beneficial.
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.
Yes, you can. Just like the answer about peanut butter above, some dogs can be allergic to things like gluten found in regular flour. Whole wheat flour can have some more nutrients which is always great, or you can use an alternative flour like coconut flour. I always recommend letting your dog sample a small amount before giving them lots of treats, because dogs can be allergic to anything, just like people!
By most accounts, the history of the industry begins with a man named James Spratt. An electrician from Cincinnati, Spratt had patented a new type of lightning conductor in 1850. Later in the decade, he traveled to England to sell it. According to industry lore, he had a quayside epiphany in London when he saw a group of dogs eating discarded hardtack, the cheap, tough biscuits carried on ships and known to sailors as "molar breakers." The first major chunk of today's pet industry was born.

In later years, dog biscuits began to be made of meat products and were sometimes treated as synonymous with dog food. In 1871, an ad appeared in Cassell's Illustrated Almanac for "SLATER'S MEAT BISCUIT FOR DOGS - Contains vegetable substances and about 25 per cent of Prepared Meat. It gives Dogs endurance, and without any other food will keep them in fine working condition."[13]
Some buyers who expected the meat to be “jerky” were quite disappointed to find the strips to be crunchy. After undergoing shipping and handling, the strips are often broken into chips and pet owners don’t like this very much. An improvement in this area will definitely earn the nod of most buyers. Generally, customers liked the idea of a treat made of a single ingredient that has been certified safe by regulating agencies.
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