As much as we love our four-legged friend, some of us have a tendency to spoil them a little bit, giving them treats containing ingredients that might not be that great for them. When your pup is looking at you with those puppy dog eyes, it’s difficult, if not impossible, not to spoil them a little. But, with spoiling, comes the importance of providing healthy dog treats, instead of treats filled with calories and unhealthy ingredients.

More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
Greenies healthy treats for dogs relieve pet owners from having to search for homemade dog treats recipes due to their rigorous testing and quality control. These doggy chews serve as a way to promote healthier teeth and gums, fight tartar, plaque, bad breath, and add vitamins and minerals to a dog’s daily diet. These second best healthy dog treats are available in jumbo, large, regular, petite, and tiny “styles” and in five different size packages (6, 12, 18, 27, and 36 ounces).
Christi is the baker, cook, blogger, food photographer, recipe developer and sprinkle lover behind Love From The Oven. As a busy mom, it's important to Christi that her recipes are family-friendly and picky eater approved. In addition to running Love From The Oven, Christi is the author of The My Little Pony Baking Book and Smart Cookie, and the co-author of Peeps-A-Licious.
Kitchn’s Delicious Links column highlights recipes we’re excited about from the bloggers we love. Follow along every weekday as we post our favorites.Flank steak is a great way to mix up proteins during the week, so your dinner isn’t all chicken, every day. It’s a comparatively inexpensive cut of beef, and I find it way easier to cook than chicken, because you don’t need to worry nearly as much about getting the meat to the exact right temperature.
Dog food – Yep, plain old dog food also works great as a treat. If you typically feed him dry food, a couple of pieces of kibble will help satisfy those cravings your canine might be experiencing between meals. Dogs usually don’t care a whole lot about what kind of treat they get, just as long as they get something. You’ll be surprised just how effective dog food can be.

Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.


OMG! Thanks a lot for sharing such an informative page about 25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes. I have read your valuable page and gotten much information. I have learned a lot from you that I did not know before. I confused for choosing the dog food recipes information what would be the best for everything but now my confusion has cleared by your review. I hope your all information will help me. Thanks again Jen Gabbard and Keep it up………..
This dog treat recipe is perfect if you’ve got some fun cookie cutters on hand. And since it’s peanut butter based it’s pretty much guaranteed to be a hit with your dog. I have yet to meet a dog who doesn’t go bonkers for PB. For this recipe you’ll need 2 cups of whole wheat flout, 1 tablespoon baking powder, 1 cup unsalted natural peanut butter and 1 cup skim milk.
That being said, the ingredients below avoid any products that are well-known doggie no-nos (like, say, chocolate!) and focus on ingredients that are generally accepted as good for doggie-dom. Just like with human food, it depends on the individual. Your dog might be allergic to wheat or eggs or pumpkin or something else. So keep a close eye on your puppy any time you give them a new food or treat. Even though these dog treats are formulated to be as gentle on their systems and give them as many added nutritional benefits as possible, they still might not agree with some pooches.

The sixth best healthy dog treats choice is another USDA certified option on this list. You can order these dog treats in three flavors – cheddar, peanut butter, and pumpkin. And what better food for dogs is there than one made with human-grade ingredients? No corn, wheat, artificial flavors, preservatives, dairy or animal by-products went into the preparation of these dog treats from Wet Noses. Each pack contains 14 ounces of crunchy treats.
My daughter volunteers at a dog rescue and we want to make several different batches and bring them to share in celebrating her birthday in a couple months. I LOVE the variety of recipes and especially ones for those dogs with grain allergies or that are diabetic! My question is, will the treats still be good if we make ahead of time and freeze them until closer to the big day? Sadly, I’m not much of a cook so I am not familiar with what freezes well and what wouldn’t.

OMG! Thanks a lot for sharing such an informative page about 25 Simple Dog Treat Recipes. I have read your valuable page and gotten much information. I have learned a lot from you that I did not know before. I confused for choosing the dog food recipes information what would be the best for everything but now my confusion has cleared by your review. I hope your all information will help me. Thanks again Jen Gabbard and Keep it up………..
Plato has produced another meat-based treat that is all-organic and all-natural. This one is made from duck meat, brown rice, natural preservatives and citric acid. It is fortified with vitamins E and C as well. Duck meat is a great protein alternative for dogs that react to other meats, such as chicken. This food product contains 30% crude protein, fats, fiber, iron and zinc.
It’s best not to feed hard treats like this to dogs because they’re hard to digest and are not a natural food for them. They don’t digest grains and flour. It causes digestive problems and aggravates health conditions like allergies and seizures. Peanuts and peanut butter contain aflotoxins which cause cancer. People and animals are advised NOT to eat both items.
One concern that a small amount of customers have is that the ingredient list includes both garlic and sodium nitrate, both of which are said to be toxic for canines. A spokesperson from the company assures readers that the amount of each is minimal (less than a few ounces of sodium nitrate per one hundred pounds of meat and less than 1% garlic per batch). He also says there are mixed reports as to whether or not garlic is okay for pets, ensuring that a small amount is not thought to be a threat regardless.
These best healthy dog treats are made in the USA and do not include artificial preservatives or common fillers, such as soy, wheat, corn, and gluten, that are found in many regular dog treats. Each bag of these gourmet dog treats contains approximately 25 sticks that are 7” to 8” long, which may be given whole or broken into pieces for smaller breeds.
As I eat my weight in sweet strawberries this time of year, the subject of what to do with the abundance of spring and summer fruit comes to mind. I am usually more than content with enjoying berries and stone fruit as-is, but when I’ve gone a little overboard at the farmers market, jam is one of the many things I consider making. Or is it jelly? The two terms for fruit spread have always confused me a bit. Luckily, there’s an easy way to distinguish between the two.

Wheat Flour, Wheat Gluten, Glycerin, Gelatin, Oat Fiber, Water, Lecithin, Natural Poultry Flavor, Minerals (Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, Magnesium Amino Acid Chelate, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Selenium, Potassium Iodide), Dried Apple Pomace, Choline Chloride, Fruit Juice Color, Vitamins ( Dl-Alpha Tocopherol Acetate [Source Of Vitamin E], Vitamin B12 Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate [Vitamin B5], Niacin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement [Vitamin B2], Vitamin D3 Supplement, Biotin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride [Vitamin B6], Thiamine Mononitrate [Vitamin B1], Folic Acid), Turmeric Color.
Facts are important, Debi, but this article on “naturalsociety.com” does not provide any. It cites minimal references, none of which actually describe a definitive link between peanut consumption and cancer. I would instead refer to peer-reviewed literature, like this article http://jn.nutrition.org/content/138/9/1757S.full.pdf+html, which indicates that the relationship is unclear, but possibly beneficial.
The case for the plaintiffs was that for many years they and their predecessor, James Spratt, had manufactured and sold, under patents of 1868 and 1881, meat biscuits for feeding dogs, the full name or description of which is " Spratt's Patent Meat Fibrine Dog Cakes," but which are often designated by them, and are commonly known in the trade, as " Spratt's Fibrine Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Biscuits," or " Spratt's Dog Cakes," or " Spratt's Meat Biscuits," or " Spratt's Patent Biscuits," or " Patent Dog Biscuits," all which, as the plaintiffs asserted, indicated biscuits of their manufacture and no other. These biscuits are made in a square form, and each is stamped with the words " Spratt's Patent" and with a + in the centre. It was alleged that " the biscuits have been found most valuable as food for dogs, and have acquired a great reputation." They are in large demand, and the plaintiffs make considerable profits from the sale thereof, which profits would be considerably larger but that, as they alleged, fraudulent imitations are frequently palmed off upon the public as the biscuits of the plaintiffs, and then it was charged that the defendant had, in fraud of the plaintiffs and of the public, " been selling to the public, as genuine dog biscuits of the plaintiffs' manufacture, biscuits which are not of the plaintiffs' manufacture, but are a fraudulent imitation thereof as to shape and appearance, and which do not contain the ingredients of the plaintiffs' biscuits." Then several instances were stated in which persons who sent to the shop of the defendant to ask for Spratt's dog biscuits received other biscuits similar, as was alleged, to the plaintiffs' in size, appearance, and weight, the only difference being that, in lieu of the words " Spratt's Patent " and the cross, the biscuits sold were stamped with a hexagon and the words " American meat."
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