More than 70 years ago, in a little shop in London an electrician named James Spratt conducted experiments which led to the production of Spratt's Patent—a scientifically blended dog food. It was the first attempt to lift the dog out of the class of scavenger which he had occupied from caveman times. The market was untouched, and in those early days, Spratt's Patent secured a bull-dog grip on it that it has never relinquished, despite the fact that in the past seventy years many competitors have tried to wrest the leadership from them. (1920)[15]
Temperatures are rising, flowers are blooming, and the spring season is now in full force. And doesn’t it truly just feel like meringue time? Lots of fresh eggs mean more whites for cooking and baking — including light-as-air meringue cookies and luscious, meringue-topped pie. And when it comes to the latter, we are always on the hunt for ways to make meringue as light, fluffy, and luxurious as possible.
To those of us who love deviled eggs (and we are legion), there is really no occasion that could not be made better by a platter of eggs stuffed with their own whipped yolks. Maybe that’s Easter lunch, their most native habitat, or a work party where everyone — even the most keto-devout! — can fall upon that plate of little morsels. But what about breakfast? Do deviled eggs belong at breakfast? Oh yes. And I have the recipe to prove it.
“In 2015, the World Health Organization found that processed meats such as bacon and sausage were known carcinogens linked to cancer. Bacon is an incredibly rich and fatty food with a high salt content, which can prove to be too much for a dog’s stomach to handle. Eating a large amount can cause pancreatitis, which can be fatal.” [http://www.akc.org/expert-advice/nutrition/natural-foods/can-dogs-eat-pork/]”
Even if you’ve never baked a thing in your life you can make these simple dog treat recipes. It’s hard to go wrong with five ingredients or less, and there’s comfort to be found in knowing exactly what’s going into your dog’s food. I make homemade dog treats when we’re working on any new training behaviors – the extra focus they bring is priceless.
Prevent unhealthy additives. Many brands of commercial dog treats are filled with preservatives, which help to extend their shelf life. In addition, store bought treats are often made from fillers and byproducts as opposed to natural and high quality ingredients. By creating your own treats at home, you will be able to provide your dog with a healthy snack that is not only nutritious but is also free of unhealthy additives.

Although the price is relatively affordable and seems acceptable to most pet parents, some customers recommend breaking every doggy treat into two pieces to get even more value per bag. A few customers have expressed their concerns about their dog refusing to eat these all natural dog treats, and some canines also had stomach problems after having the treat, including vomiting or gas. However, these cases seem to be very rare. Other customers also mentioned that the crumbly texture of these healthy dog treats can make a mess and that their dogs would rather play with these pet treats instead of actually eating them.
The English dog biscuit appears to be a nineteenth-century innovation: "With this may be joined farinaceous and vegetable articles — oat-meal, fine-pollard, dog-biscuit, potatoes, carrots, parsnips" (1827);[10] "being in the neighbourhood of Maidenhead, I inspected Mr. Smith's dog-biscuit manufactory, and was surprised to find he has been for a long period manufacturing the enormous quantity of five tons a-week !" (1828)[11]

Bully Sticks are popular options because they are made form 100% beef tendon. The best and healthiest bully sticks are made from US or Brazilian beef that is grass-raised and free from the use of antibiotics or growth promoters. Being high in protein, each bully stick has nutrition value and just be aware of this so you don’t accidentally give too many calories.
No matter what type of treat you choose, Farcas says to make sure treats don’t make up more than 5-10 percent of your dog’s diet. Though the foods on this list aren’t known to cause problems for dogs, keep in mind that you should discuss any dietary concerns with your veterinarian and know that they might have a different outlook on feeding certain foods to dogs.
I was just reading the above comments. If a dog needs to be wheat free oats are generally not a good idea to use unless they are gluten free oats or oatmeal. Of course every dog is different. But with people who either have wheat sensitivities (gluten) or Celiac’s you can’t eat any type of flour and it includes the oats too. My dog has wheat issues and she can’t touch oatmeal anything :( Try in moderation for your dogs.
×